Questions to avoid asking LGBTQ

While we like to think that we live in a more accepting day and age, there are many ignorant people out there. Some of those unaware people might not know that they are ignorant. So I thought I would share some no appropriate questions to ask people under the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer community. Some of these you would consider common sense, but you would also be common sense for people to know how to wear a mask, but that’s an article for a different day.

Kelly Kapoor Office Gif that kind of fits to set the mood

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Is this because you all are snowflakes?

No, this isn’t because LGBTQ is snowflakes or sensitive. It’s just that many people ask questions that are invasive or come across as you trying to devalue someone. It’s okay to have questions and to try to understand them. You have to understand you might not ask some of your questions because they are invasive, following stereotypes, or just something you shouldn’t ask anyone. Keep in mind: These are just general things to avoid. Each person will be different; some people might not care if you ask these questions. Here’s the actual questions:

WHAT PARTS DO YOU HAVE?

Again, you would think that this would be common sense, but we wouldn’t need this article. So asking a transgender person what genitals they have is like asking how big someone’s penis is or details about someone’s vagina. You don’t do this. While I’m not transgender, I know I would like someone asking that of me. Unless you are super close to that person, I would assume like you are about to bang, you really shouldn’t care about whether someone should have a vagina or a penis

HOW DO YOU KNOW?

Before you ask this, I would ask yourself, “How did you know?” So if you are straight, “How did you know that you were Heterosexual?” I’ll give you a moment to ponder that. Did you ponder it? Does it seem like a stupid question? Because it is. If you ask, “when did you realize…,” that is a little more of a better question. Just like heterosexuals, LGBTQ is born the way they are. Lady Gaga didn’t write a song called “Born This Way” to be cute. It’s true. You are born that way at birth, but you might not realize it until down the road. Everyone is going to be different with this. Granted, “When did you realize…” is still a super personal question that I wouldn’t say right off the bat.

BUT AREN’T YOU REALLY JUST GAY?

This question is mainly for the Bisexuals out there! Let’s say this together: BISEXUALS.ARE.A.LEGITMATELY.ORIENTATION. There’s also a reason it’s called LGBTQ and not LGTQ. Besides, it rolls off the tongue better like both genders are legitimately and need to be more respectful than it should. There’s so much biphobia in the world, and frankly, it’s unneeded. Just because you have been with the same gender doesn’t make it any less valid that you might find them attractive along with the opposite gender. It’s like assuming that bisexuals are going to cheat on you because they like both genders. 

Are you sure? You don’t look or sound gay

Please explain to me what looking or sounding gay is. I didn’t know that a sexual orientation looked or say a certain way. I’m afraid that’s not right in so many ways. You can’t go off stereotypes presented in the media. Stereotypes are mistaken ideas or beliefs that many people have about a thing or group based upon how they look on the outside, which may be untrue or only partly true. While homosexual males might like Celine Dion, Cher, etc. They aren’t necessarily extraordinarily flamboyant and wearing pink bows while waving a rainbow on the street. They are shirtless and wearing sex harness that shows off their abs while in their underwear. It’s called pride wear. It’s like the old saying goes, “you can’t judge a book by its cover.” So please stop judging people based on outdated stereotypes. It’s not classy. Here’s my tale about it. 

I hope these inappropriate questions get the ball rolling on thinking before you speak. Like I mentioned prior, responses can vary on the person. I just generalized everyone like how most people generalized the LGBTQ community for years. Please think, “how would I respond to this” before you ask something. That would help a lot of our world issues if we did that more.

 

Inspirational Pride Quotes from Jojo Siwa

Since this Pride month is a little different than usual, I thought it was fitting if we look at some inspirational quotes from the person that most people would look at unless you are under the age of 12. I’m talking about Jojo Siwa, the girl with the massive bow. Originally on the show, “Dance Moms,” Jojo has become the Nickelodeon star that gives children Kids Bops style of music that doesn’t suck.

Jojo’s brand is all about self-acceptance and being yourself. Something that is Pride is all about. In an interview with Time, JoJo said that she models this from the late lead singer of the rock band Queen, Freddie Mercury.

“He was unapologetically himself … He looked different than everyone,” Jojo told Time. “I’ve always been like that, and I’ve never really known someone who pretty much does what I do.” She’s only 17 but she going to one a young LGBTQ+ source of inspiration because of the fact that she’s an ally and she truly loves her fans the way they are. Here are some inspirational quotes from Jojo that come from her lyrics:

For those haters that judge you

For when people don’t like you for you

To those who want you to be “normal”

When you just want to be your authentic self

For when you are your full authentic self

When you feel alone and like no one understands who you are

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Movie Review | ‘Out’

Disney and LGBTQ+ theme content has not always been positive. The “Love, Simon” spin-off was shipped off to Hulu instead of Disney+ due to feeling that it wouldn’t appropriate for families to watch with their children. While I rolled my eyes hard at this, their subsidiary Pixar produced an LGBTQ+ for their short film series on Disney+ streaming platform just in time for Pride month.

“Out” is a nine-minutes short written and directed by Steven Hunter, who is best known for animating “Finding Nemo” and “Wall-E.” It’s the first Disney and Pixar movie to feature a gay main character and on-screen same-sex kiss. The short is apart of Pixar’s “SparkShorts” series on Disney+. The series is a program present by Pixar employees where they have six months and a limited budget to produce short films. These short films are personal and based on personal experiences. “SparkShorts” and the program was created to produced new filmmakers.

“It’s somewhat based on my coming-out story, and yet it’s nothing like my coming-out story,” Steven told Entertainment. Weekly, “I was trying to make a film for my 17-year-old queer self, the guy who needed to see something of himself in a film,” 

The film follows Greg as he and his boyfriend Manuel are boxing up Greg’s home for a move. Greg’s parents surprise him by showing up at his doorstep. Greg hides his life with Manuel as Manuel leaves through the backdoor due to him not being out with his parents. As he tries to keep his parents from finding out that he’s gay, he and his dog end up switching places due to a magical cat and dog.

This film is adorable. When I first watched it, I wasn’t too sure about it because of Disney’s past with LGBTQ+. The story is something that hit homes for everyone LGBTQ+ has to deal with – Coming out. It deals with it sweetly. Because it’s an animated film, the director was able to take a different approach to the coming out theme. We have never seen a “Freaky Friday” take to it. I mean, there are not that many films to deal with coming out, but that is beside the point.

My biggest complaint with it isn’t with the content of the film but rather how it sugar-coated for Disney. The film has a PG rating. The rating is because of the fact two men kiss in the movie. I don’t see how why parent guidance would be needed just because of the kiss. There are many worse animated things that Disney has on Disney+ than two men kissing. Frankly, the film is more of a G rating.

The PG rating just perpetuates the notion that being LGBTQ+ isn’t right. You don’t need to have a conversation with your kids about being gay unless they are. It’s not something you need to talk about like it’s a lesson. Now if they are being homophobic, then that is something that needs to be addressed. But treating two people of the same gender as something parents need to discuss with their children is wrong. While Disney made a step in the right direction with “Out,” the rating isn’t.

There is also a pacing issue with the film. It is trying to get much information and tell the store in under 10 minutes. The film starts well, and then it kind of rushes in the middle and once Greg switches bodies with his dog. It is not a big pacing issue, but it seemed like they wanted to spend more time with Greg in his dog’s body but ran out of time and had to wrap it up. I also want to know more about the magical dog and cat. That was just random. There is probably no meaning behind them besides just being a plot device to how Greg and his dog traded bodies.

Verdict

“Out” is an excellent short film that I think everyone needs to watch, whether they are LGBTQ+ or not. It is just a sweet film that we need more of it in the media. I hope that Disney and Pixar do more LGBTQ+ movies/series, only without the slightly problematic rating. I do wish that the film was longer because it has a slight pacing issue. “Out” is currently available only on Disney+

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

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Let’s talk about Pride

Every year during Pride Month, some people think it’s a good idea to have “straight pride” parade It’s pretty much like clockwork. So I thought it would be a perfect time to talk about everything that is wrong with the idea of a “straight pride” parade and why we have Pride. It’s sad that we still have to deal with stuff like this in 2019.

What’s wrong with Straight Pride?

First thing is that I’m not saying you shouldn’t be proud and show pride in who you are and your sexuality. No one is saying that. In fact, if you are straight, you should be celebrating the fact that you don’t have to worry about whether or not you will get beat up or killed for showing public displays of affection with the person you love. You don’t have to worry about getting called slurs or disowned because you love who you love.

Sure, it can happen if you are straight, but it’s more than less just based on the character of the person you are dating. It could also be based on whether or not your love is forbidden based on family blood feud if you are in a CW drama or soap opera. But it’s not usually based on the gender of the person you love. If what I have listed still doesn’t make you under what Pride month is really all about, then I feel sorry for you.

Why we have Pride?

Pride month is the month that the LGBTQ celebrates each other and themselves. Between people tell you that you are going to hell for loving who you love, fear of not being accepted by those close to you, or constantly being judged, Pride is a celebration of being proud of who you are. It’s a celebration of being and loving who you are. It’s a celebration of being different and just being you.

When all Americans are treated as equal, no matter who they are or whom they love, we are all more free.”–Barack Obama.

The reason that there is a Pride Month is because of the Stonewall Riots in 1969. Stonewall Riots were against police raids on a local LGBTQ bar just because they were LGBTQ. They were having a good time and enjoying life, but that was against the law. At this time, it was illegal to LGBTQ. The US Government kept lists on people that were/suspected of being LGBTQ, LGBTQ friendly establishments, and anyone friends with LGBTQ. You could legally fire someone for being LGBTQ. They would track your mail if you got LGBTQ material sent to you. Cities even did sweeps to get rid of LGBTQ. THAT IS WAY THERE IS PRIDE.

What is Pride?

Pride is a place where everyone is accepted for just being them. It’s just full of love and acceptance. No one is there to judge you, make you feel bad about yourself. That’s what Pride is all about. It’s not about trying to cause a scene or show this group of being that you are better than them.

Before you sit there and think to yourself, “It’s not fair, why isn’t there a Pride for straight people?” I recommend you research why there is a need for pride for LGBTQ. That’s the problem with 95% of society today. No one looks up anything and just believe the first thing they hear. The fact that you don’t have a Pride/Heritage/History month doesn’t mean you don’t exist. It just means you didn’t have to fight for your right to exist.

To straight people, be grateful that you can bang in the streets without worrying about getting killed, beat up, or stoned. You can hold hands down the road or kiss under the stars in public. You can also get married without people telling you that your bond isn’t legal or real. Feel free to come to pride as long as you aren’t a bigoted asshole. All are welcome. You don’t have to be LGBTQ to go to Pride. It may be shocking, but even straight people go to pride. You don’t have to be LGBTQ to support the message that Pride gives.

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